October 23, 2014 2:35 AM

Author Topic: Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll  (Read 13902 times)

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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« on: August 30, 2007 9:47 PM »
Pleats (quilting) and tuck & roll have been used in automotive interiors since the beginning of enclosed interiors.  Not only do they add to the looks, but also keep the material (fabric, vinyl, leather) from becoming full of stretch wrinkles.

Pleats, or actually quilting, is the sewing of the upholstery material to a layer of padding with a backing fabric.  The quilting is usually done in a combination of lines to form a design.  Lines, diamonds, squares, rectangles, etc.  Even free form quilting (although you have to consider the shrinkage) can work. Basically any design you can dream up can work with a little planning.  When complete, the stitching thread shows on the top side of the upholstery material.

Most quilting pleats are done in or 3/4 inch foam backed with muslin or denim.  The density of the foam will determine how well the pleats stand out.  The common ½ inch foam with muslin adhered to the back side found in many stores including MACs is good enough for trim panels.  If upholstering seats, go to a better grade of foam and possibly move to 3/4 inch. This will hold the pleats better on seats.  The cheaper stuff will flatten out in a short period of time.

The common size of straight vertical pleats is 1 inches to 2 inches apart.  The big thing to consider and allow for is the shrinkage that takes place for each sewn pleat.  Allow half the thickness of the foam for each pleat sewn.  So for inch foam allow 1/4 inch extra for each pleat that is sewn.  For 3/4 inch allow about 3/8 for each sew.  Draw out the pleats and sew using as long a stitch as the sewing machine will sew, through the top material, foam, and backing.  Too close of stitching will weaken the material, especially vinyl,  and it will eventually tear on the pleat.

True tuck and roll involved sewing a top material to a backing fabric like denim.  The top material was either cut in strips or folded over face to face and sewn to a backing fabric. After all tucks were sewn, each was stuffed with horse hair or later cotton (straw if you weren't watching in Tijuana) using piping tins.  Two smooth, concave shaped, long tins were filled with the padding.  They were slid down into each sewn sheath and then the tins were pulled, one at a time, leaving the padding in and a  rolled appearance. 

Today, tuck and roll is done by using the former technique for sewing quilted pleats.  Once all the pleats are sewn, lay the material over face to face on the pleat.  Now sew through all the layers about a 1/4 inch in from the edge.  It's a good idea to lock in or tie the ends of each so it does not start to come out from the pressure of the padding.

Again, the big consideration to remember is the shrinkage from all the sewing.  It will now be about 3/4 inch for each tuck.  Pretty common sizes of vertical tuck and roll is ending up about 2 inches to 3 inches wide.  So if you start your figuring of 2" wide quilting, your tuck and roll will end up about 1 3/4" to 1 7/8" when complete.  Any smaller will become difficult to work with.  Another common size for wider seats and full benches would be starting with 3" quilting.  The tuck and roll will end up about 2 3/4 when complete.

I use a denser inch foam and back it with newer headliner fabric.  The headliner fabric has a 1/4 inch of foam bonded to it so the whole thing is now 3/4" and the backing fabric is included.  For both quilting and tuck & roll only glue the foams and backing materials together. Don't glue the top fabric, vinyl, or leather to the foam.  This allows it to shrink and move with wear and tear.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 6:51 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2007 9:49 PM »
Vinyl, " foam glued to 1/4" headliner fabric. Pleats chalked out.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 5:34 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2007 9:51 PM »
Sew quilted pleats.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 5:34 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2007 9:53 PM »
After all pleats are sewn, fold face to face on pleat and sew through all layers about a quarter of an inch in from edge.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 5:35 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2007 9:55 PM »
Here is quilted with stitching showing next to tuck and roll (no thread showing).
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 5:36 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2007 10:00 PM »
Here are some seats I did this summer......

Red 1937 Ford coupe seat with 1 " quilted pleats. (Stitching shows.)
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 5:37 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2007 10:02 PM »
Toupe 1938 Ford tudor sedan seat with 2 3/4" tuck and roll (no thread shows.)
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 5:37 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2007 10:05 PM »
Glide seat with collared inserts.  1 7/8" tuck and roll - no thread shows.

That's it!
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014 5:38 PM by JakesBackyard »
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Offline Tom

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2007 1:34 PM »
Nice job Jake!! You do good work. It's nice to see the lines fron tha back rest line up with the bottom.
"A rat rod is a hot rod with poor workmanship". Roger S.

Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2007 7:54 PM »
Thanks Tom.  Hopefully someone picks up a tip or two with the posts.
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Offline overspray

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2007 11:57 PM »
WOW!  I've always wondered how this was done and the differences.  I think you should post this on the HAMB for the next tech week.

KOOL!!

Offline JakesBackyard

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2007 1:57 PM »
Thanks Reed.  I'll probably pass on the HAMB tech. I've read the HAMB since the beginning, finally joined a while back so I could see the pics, but have enough to do without getting too involved in another forum.
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Offline Eyeball

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2007 2:13 PM »
Thanks for putting it together....you have a hell of a talent.
take a look at THE FORDSON HOUSE web site


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Offline sko_ford

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2007 5:49 PM »
thanks for the lesson ive read some on interior work but they tend to skip tuck in roll in the books ive seen.

so how about piping and edgeing for the next class?
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Offline overspray

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Pleats vs. Tuck-N-Roll
« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2007 6:52 PM »
Quote from: "JakesBackyard"
Thanks Reed.  I'll probably pass on the HAMB tech. I've read the HAMB since the beginning, finally joined a while back so I could see the pics, but have enough to do without getting too involved in another forum.



CUT & PASTE  you already did the hard part.  Contributions of info like this are the key to keeping our hobby alive--Especially from talented Norwegians!!!----like yourself.

I think it is an ethnic thing.