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Author Topic: some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)  (Read 14069 times)

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Offline overspray

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2007 9:47 PM »
"overspray technical production videos inc."  are available to do a "TomH classic gas Welding" video series.

Have your "people" call my "people".

Offline Eyeball

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #31 on: August 21, 2007 9:57 PM »
The car is all in primer now including the bottom. I am going to spray the bottom and the inner deck lid with color tonight then I can finish blocking the car.

Shoud I "paint the inside of the car body or just make some quick passes over it to seal it?
take a look at THE FORDSON HOUSE web site


"i did, i'm building a car, not a tractor "

 SILENT RICK HAMB

Offline overspray

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #32 on: August 22, 2007 3:29 AM »
Look it over and see what is actually going to show after the car has been assembled and the interior installed.  Paint the areas that will show, for sure, they will have to be masked off when you do the outside.  The rest is your choice.  Depending on what you have in mind. you can paint the whole inside very nice (show quality) before the outside is painted or even use a brush friendly coating on non showing areas after the outside is done.  If you go for the "show quality" inside it will have to be masked off very well before spraying the outside.  If your very cool Merc dash is removable, paint it outside the car.

Offline overspray

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #33 on: August 24, 2007 2:00 PM »
This guy is almost as good as the "King".   (Pay no attention to the MULLET).  Do a search on youtube.  He has a bunch of real good short videos.



Offline overspray

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #34 on: August 24, 2007 2:09 PM »
This is way easier than making my own videos.  Now me and the "King" can drink more beer.



Offline overspray

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #35 on: August 24, 2007 4:52 PM »
Quote from: "Tom"
Quote from: "overspray"
.The old Sharpe 775 is still available, at your disposal.  It worked very well on the "NOW MORE FAMOUS THAN EVER"   HUBER  "TRACK ROADSTER".


If you use this gun make sure you have lots of air movin' to get rid of the over spray. It does a good job of keeping the orange peel to a minimum but it put's out some fog.

I have relied heavily on Reed for advice and help when I got to paint. He's always more than willing to lend a hand!!


Less "orange-peel"  means less work cutting and buffing, if you go that route.



Offline Eyeball

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« Reply #36 on: August 24, 2007 6:00 PM »
I am not going to be using the HVLP gun anymore. I picked up a new HF siphon type yesterday with a 1.7 tip and it really laid the primer down nice. The primer is visibly "shinier" than the other parts that were shot with the HVLP and much smoother when you look close.  I will test it painting the deckled tonight if I get a chance. I also picked up that small gravity fed touch up gun that you showed earlier.
take a look at THE FORDSON HOUSE web site


"i did, i'm building a car, not a tractor "

 SILENT RICK HAMB

Offline Eyeball

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #37 on: August 27, 2007 2:34 PM »
I sprayed sealer on the decklid. Had a few fisheyes so I sanded it down again and re shot it. No more fisheyes but I do have dust in it that I need to sand out. So the question is can I sand the sealer b4  I shoot the color and how fine should the paper be to spray color over?

Edit: I started to sand it at lunch with 400-600 wet. There were a few sags I did't see. I plan on shooting the paint over this coat. If I sand through where I can see the lighter primer will this effect the top coat or am I better of coating it again. Also if the sealer is wet saned is there any set time I have to put top coat on it or does the 5 day window still apply?
take a look at THE FORDSON HOUSE web site


"i did, i'm building a car, not a tractor "

 SILENT RICK HAMB

Offline overspray

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« Reply #38 on: August 28, 2007 2:03 AM »
400-600# should be OK.  If you sand a run in the sealer out, remember to feather out for a few inches carefully.  The sandpaper will glide over the run and cut a little "trough" on either side while leaving a little higher on the run, which will show up in the finish.  Using a small block (paint stick or equivilent) will help knock down just the run area til it's flat.  Kind of like filing the run down with a file.  Then feather out the surrounding area lightly.

 I'm not sure on the recoat time (sealer) after wetsanding.  It will probably shorten the time some, but so will high temps.  You are probably OK.

 On the recoat you can just put a coat (of color) on the sanded areas (runs-dirt) and let that flash off then continue with a complete coat of color.  Kind of like using the color for resealing those areas.

Offline Eyeball

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #39 on: August 28, 2007 4:40 AM »
Nuther question....what grit can I use to block out the body. 150 (dry) seems too agressive but 400 (wet) takes toooooooo damn long ( I luv body work). Can I use like a 220 dry or ???????????
take a look at THE FORDSON HOUSE web site


"i did, i'm building a car, not a tractor "

 SILENT RICK HAMB

Offline Tom

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« Reply #40 on: August 28, 2007 1:27 PM »
Don't know how many of you picked up on this on oversprays last video. He is talkin' about bumps in paint ( orange peel ) and is wearing a Hooters T-shirt. !!! Need I say more.
"A rat rod is a hot rod with poor workmanship". Roger S.

Offline overspray

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« Reply #41 on: August 28, 2007 3:20 PM »
Quote from: "Eyeball"
Nuther question....what grit can I use to block out the body. 150 (dry) seems too agressive but 400 (wet) takes toooooooo damn long ( I luv body work). Can I use like a 220 dry or ???????????


If you are really trying to "block" something straight,  400# is to fine for the first pass. Remember to use a guide coat.   Blocking means cutting the high spots down and exposing low areas.  150# seems agressive, but you need to cut the high spots without just rolling over them like you will with 400#.  I use anywhere from 100# to 180# for the first block on HIGH BUILD primer. "Back in the day" with non catalyzed primer and lacquer paint, this process would take at least 6 weeks to several months for custom work.  On the flat areas on the quarter panels cris-cros "X" sand with the 150# just enough to see you are flat, then switch to 220# with the same technique just to cut the 150# scratch down.  At this point stay away from the body lines.  Very carefully do the body line areas with the 220#. Very low spots will need filler (Glazing). If you see a lot of bare metal or the primer is getting real thin, it's going to need another couple coats, probably reduced with just a little thinner to smoothe out better, at least in the spots where you really had to block and took a lot of material off.  If it seems straight before you put the last coat of primer on, then you can final wet sand with 360 to 400# (single stage urethane will fill about 360# or finer wet sanding).  If you have some small bare metal areas after this (thumbnail size or smaller) the sealer will be OK to cover these.  The black sealer is going to show how well you did, so set up the lighting for the sealer/paint so you can see how straight the body is as you spray.

After all this work, you will find you have NO fingerprints.  Time to see if a life of crime is for you.

Offline overspray

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« Reply #42 on: August 28, 2007 3:31 PM »
About halfway thru this video are some good block sanding techniques.


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« Reply #43 on: August 28, 2007 3:32 PM »
Quote from: "Tom"
Don't know how many of you picked up on this on oversprays last video. He is talkin' about bumps in paint ( orange peel ) and is wearing a Hooters T-shirt. !!! Need I say more.


Tom knows me too well!!!

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some painting tips for Eyeball (overspray 101)
« Reply #44 on: January 05, 2008 8:02 AM »
i registered to say thank you for the amazing videos.  too bad i didnt see them BEFORE i painted my car today! haha